Posts Tagged ‘social’

Deftones’ Chino Moreno + Former Isis Members Complete First Palms Album

Ipecac Recordings Deftones frontman Chino Moreno is a man of many projects and his latest finds him recording with several former members of the band Isis in a new group called Palms . The band has confirmed the completion of their self-titled debut album and the disc is now due June 25 through Ipecac Recordings. Moreno is joined by the band by Jeff Caxide, Aaron Harris and Bryant Clifford Meyer. They’ve been working on new music during breaks in Moreno’s schedule over the past year, with Harris handling mixing duties and all of the band members serving as producers. The Deftones frontman stated last fall about the project, “They recorded this music a long time ago, almost a year ago, so musically it’s been its own thing and I only got asked to do vocals on it not too long ago by my buddy Aaron [Harris], he’s the drummer. It’s not really a thing I rush on. Any of the projects I do, I don’t have to do them. I do them strictly because it’s fun to make music with friends and to do that.” Moreno recently took to his Mixlr account, where he played an early, unmastered version of the band’s song ‘Tropics,’ which will be part of the upcoming disc. The group recently launched an official website , but at present only a splash page with a photo and links to their social network accounts is all that is part of it. [button href=”http://loudwire.com/deftones-spring-2013-u-s-tour/” title=”Next: Deftones Announce Spring 2013 Tour” align=”center”]

Jason Newsted on New Band Dynamics, Besting Justin Bieber on iTunes + Tour Plans

NewstedHeavyMetal.com In the first part of our exclusive interview with Jason Newsted , he discussed his new EP ‘Metal,’ as well as the influence of his former Metallica bandmate James Hetfield, among other topics. In Part 2 of our interview, Newsted delves into the relationships he has with the members of his new band (which aptly goes by the name Newsted), the satisfaction of beating pop star Justin Bieber on an iTunes chart and plans for future releases from his new group. Read Part 2 of our Jason Newsted interview below: How much of the sound of this new material came down to the fact that you did this as a three-piece. There are certain points where I hear almost jazz-like drumming and then it just turns around and kills. And interaction and response like that sometimes seems to come more easily when you have three guys that are focused on each other and locked in. Right and these three people, you know, the one thing that’s the most valuable in any [grouping of] players is the years that they’ve spent together and how they’ve learned to become one and how they learned to become that gelling thing, like any great band that finds that place. So we’ve been together for long enough and we all have enough chops under our belts from previous [bands] and other things that we’re able to do that. Now that we have five years together as a trio, we know what’s going on and [guitarist] Jessie [Farnsworth] and Jesse [drummer Jesus Mendez] have 10 years together playing, so you can’t deny that stuff. And that’s why it does sound the way it does, the way it syncs up like that. You can’t replace that. It’s the very most invaluable thing to have in a band. I could have put together a supergroup — and I had it all drawn out and everything and I still might [do that] someday — but that’s not what’s going on here for these songs. These cats are hard workers — they’re disciplined and they’re not drugged and they’re ready to go at it with me. They’ve paid their dues and it’s time for some credit for them. Being able to live vicariously through them as they [experience things for the first time], like when we finished the video and they saw the first clip the other day, they were just freaking out. And I remember that feeling, you know? And I’m really happy for them in that way. If I got supergroup guys — people bring in their baggage and they also bring in the stuff that we were just talking about. How could we get in all of those years with the guys you want to put in the supergroup if you already spent all of your years with another group? You wouldn’t have that [same feeling]. There’d be great music and everybody’s like a virtuoso and great players and all of that kind of thing, but in order to get that real, real long sink your teeth into it kind of riffs, it takes a while to gel it. It seems like it’s very important for you to make music with friends these days. It’s definitely important to get along with everybody. That’s really the thing, now that so much time has passed and I’ve played with lots of people. If I’m going to get serious about something, it has to be people that I really dig that are strong in their own right — go-getters and all of that. Jessie Farnsworth — the guitar guy — he’s done his own records, writing all of the songs, lead guitar guy, frontman — all of that stuff on his own. [He’s] very accomplished. Jesus has been in all kinds of different bands, for a long, long time. They’re already accomplished in their own way, to step up and support me and believe in my vision and all of that kind of thing. It’s very helpful to have people that are that in tune with it and still are that hungry. I don’t really have to be hungry, but I am and that’s kind of cool. What were the lyrical drivers for these songs? Looking at the lyrics, there’s a lot of different things going on, topically. I’ve been writing lyrics for a long, long time. You look around you and see what you’re taking in from all of the data that’s in front of our faces all of the time. And that’s kind of from different stories and different things that mean something to me personally. ‘King of the Underdogs,’ there’s a little personal story vibe in there. ‘Skyscraper’ is about terrorists and you’ve gotta read in between the lines there. ‘Soldierhead’ is for all of our military service personnel guys and girls … you hear such crazy stories about all of that and I met so many thousands of soldiers in my life traveling around the world and they’ve always been so supportive of the metal, so that’s my tip of the hat to them. I’m glad that everybody loves the song for what it is, because it can represent something for all of us as they represent us. ‘Godsnake’ is a little bit deeper and it has to do with judging people. I’ve made the mistake in my travels of judging people and then getting really slapped in the face with it. I think [that’s a problem] in our society with modern day [society] anyway, at least in North America, with reality shows and all of these things where people are almost encouraged to judge others. You know, ‘The Biggest Loser’ and this guy and this addict and this person [let’s] judge these girls for being too skinny and these girls for being too beautiful and blah blah blah. We’re really more than ever, encouraged to judge and I think that this one is about: don’t judge – be careful. If God came down as a snake, how would you judge him? I have my notebooks and stuff and I’ve been writing poems for a long, long time. So I just pull stuff out that makes sense to me and adheres to the music. It has to tell the story. I don’t want to do any wasted words anymore. These aren’t Flotsam lyrics anymore, you know? [Laughs.] This is the first of a three-pronged release plan. How representative is the material on this EP in comparison to the next two EPs and ultimately, the full album that’s going to come out? That’s a good question — I can’t give up too much! [Laughs] I’ve got a little plan. It’s all heavy music – like we started our conversation – it’s all heavy music. The logo says “Newsted Heavy Metal Music” and that’s what all of the 11 songs are. Some are more musical than others — some are heavier than others, some are more metal than others, but they’re all three, every one of them, [made up of “heavy music”], so that’s all I can really say about that. The plan is to do three batches and depending on how the fans respond to it — how long the legs are on each one — I’ll release them accordingly. But we’ve got them already recorded. They’re already done. Anthony Focx came in and helped us record. We just went in for a couple of weeks and did 11 songs. He’s the guy that worked on Aerosmith and the Metallica stuff for ‘Guitar Hero,’ so that was a big deal that he came in and helped us out and captured our thing, because he pretty much put the mics on, turned the light on and we just went for it. We were able to capture the moment, so we were lucky in that way for sure. So, will the final album going to lay out in the sequence that we’re hearing it on the EPs? Yeah. The full plan is that like today, being the initial release day for the iTunes download….which is No. 1 today on iTunes by the way. I’m pretty psyched up about that. Actually right now, I have three albums that I played on in the Top 10 in iTunes. We’re No. 1 and ‘Justice’ is three and ‘Black Album’ is seven or something like that, so that’s kind of crazy. I did something right there along the way. So anyway, we do the iTunes release first and [now you can visit]  NewstedHeavyMetal.com [to order] the actual CD package with lyrics, and that will happen each time. So it will be available to start shipping physical copies, two weeks after each iTunes release. And then at the end of that when the final one comes and it’s the culmination of all three EPs in one thing, it will be out on vinyl with some of my artwork and all of that stuff. So it’s kind of a grand plan and I want to have it out in all forms eventually, however each individual likes to take their music on. That’s my ultimate goal is to have it out on CD, vinyl and for iTunes. And it seems like all of this material is coming out conveniently with the last round arriving just in time for you to hit the road for summer touring. Yeah, that’s kind of the plan. I’m getting a lot of offers now and some pretty cool ones. People are coming with respect and that’s what has to happen. It doesn’t have to be big money, because that’s definitely not what it’s about this time. As long as we’ve got good gigs and we’re at a good place on the bill and my band is safe with decent accommodations and the venues are reputable, we’ll take it wherever we possibly can. With the current state of the industry, it seems like everytime you make music, you’re forced to adjust to all of the things that have changed since the last time you put something out. Putting this new material out in stages, was it difficult to break it up into pieces instead of just putting it out as a full traditional album? It was actually easier and better this way and seemingly more comfortable. I think there’s about 30 or 40 percent of the old avenues left that I knew when I stepped out on the top of the metal mountain. It was different then. Things had just started coming with piracy and all of that stuff and it was just a different world when we went out with ‘Black Album’ and ‘Load’ and all of those things, it was a very, very different world. So now there’s 30 or 40 percent of the same old ones, where you’ve got to take it to the people, no two ways about that and then the 60 or 70 percent that’s all new avenues that I need to maybe unlearn some of the old ones and relearn the new ones. And I’m trying to embrace it, like we were talking about with the social media stuff and all of that, getting it out to the people and reconnecting with the fans is the main thing first. As long as they know that it’s there and that I’m going to be playing somewhere, they’re going to show up – I’m confident of that. There’s a lot for me to learn … a lot of unknown territory for me as far as the marketing stuff and the live stuff, so I’ve got some good people in my corner. We have a team of four people right now, including myself, and we got the EP to number one [on iTunes] the first day with just the four of us coming out of the Chophouse. We just passed up [Justin] Bieber an hour ago and the freakin’ overall charts went up to 15, ahead of the Beatles and Bieber and all this other stuff and that’s pretty crazy considering our little metal show [that’s happening] out of my garage, you know? So we’ve been able to harness it pretty good. I’ve actually been quite enlightened by all of this. I repelled the technology for years and years. I will always keep one big black boot in the analog — you’re not going to get that out of there — but the other one, I am reaching it out and stepping on new ground and there’s a whole lotta new stuff going on for me with this thing, man. [There’s] new roles to be played. I’m going to be the frontman. Sometimes I’m going to be playing guitar and fronting — most of the time I will be playing bass and fronting — but we will switch instruments onstage and all of that crazy stuff to keep it interesting. So, playing guitar in front of people when I’ve just got a very much Roky Erickson approach to guitar — I know two chords and I rock it up and down the neck as hard as I can instead of [stressing about] placing it in the right places and the other guys put the color on it. I don’t pretend to be a great guitar player, I just know how I can do it and I just do it that way. The bass player [position] is a different thing because I feel very comfortable that way and when I get up to scream with it on, I’m feeling strong. But it’s some new roles that I’m assuming here, for sure. The ability for you to announce something like this and have music out only a couple of months later probably hearkens back a little bit to your DIY beginnings as an artist. The only difference is that you’ve got the social media to help spread it now instead of having to take a tape to everybody that you want to hear about your band. You are insightful. You think about this for a second, man, if we go for a 60 year ride back right now. ‘53, B.B. King [is] driving around the B.B. King Review in a nine door Checker cab station wagon thing, with “B.B. King Review” painted down the side. He drove that thing around with his people and they had their record [or] 45 selling out of the trunk or whatever [and they were getting] a nickel per song or a quarter per show and [building up fans] one person at a time [with] a juke joint here and this place there, back of somebody’s place … all of that — and you have to do that today again, except that you’ve got the Internet and social media to let people know that you’re going to be there. That’s the difference. It’s hard to sell any music or anything [like that], you get out and get as many copies sold as you can, but mostly, it’s going to be stolen and spread around the world and you just have to accept that. The new way and always way to do it, is to take it out to the people. You have to be determined to work hard, take it to the people and just let them know that you’re coming. That’s the only difference. But it’s gotta be your CD sold at your show, your t-shirt sold at your show, your trinket [with] your emblem, your Newsted Heavy Metal pendant [is] sold at the show and I know that. That’s just going to make sure that we cover the gas and stuff. Stay tuned for Part 3 of our exclusive Jason Newsted interview, in which he talks about his current relationship with the guys in Metallica and more. [button href=”http://loudwire.com/jason-newsted-talks-metal-ep-soldierhead-single-james-hetfields-influence-more/” title=”Read Part 1 of our Jason Newsted Interview Here” align=”center”] ?

Jason Newsted Talks ‘Metal’ EP, ‘Soldierhead’ Single, James Hetfield’s Influence + More

NewstedHeavyMetal.com Former Metallica bassist Jason Newsted is back in a big way with his new band, simply called Newsted. The outfit has just released a new EP called ‘Metal’ and it features the blistering new single ‘Soldierhead.’ We spoke with Newsted for nearly an hour, and he covered everything from his new music to beating Justin Bieber on the iTunes chart to his current relationship with the guys in Metallica. In Part 1 of our interview, Newsted discusses his ‘Metal EP’ ( available on iTunes ), the new single ‘Soldierhead’ and the influence that Metallica frontman James Hetfield has had on him. Check out Part 1 of our interview with Jason Newsted below: The material on this new EP has a lot of interesting shades to it from the full on attack of “Soldierhead” to the almost Thin Lizzy-like tones that thread through the beginning of ‘Kings of the Underdogs.’ How does it all fit together for you? It’s all metal, you know? It’s all heavy music. Some of it’s fast and some of it’s slow and it has some of those different nuances that you’re speaking of. I think a lot of my obvious great teachers and heroes really rear their heads. Motorhead, [Laughs] Motorhead is one of the heads that rears for sure! [Also] Black Sabbath’s stuff and some of the original Ted Nugent band [material with] Rob Grange playing bass — some of that real musicality with old school bass players — that kind of thing comes through in some of the bass lines. I wrote all of the songs on GarageBand and iPad last August/September and played all of the instruments. I played all of the rhythm guitars on all of the recordings, played bass on half of the tracks [and] Jessie [Farnsworth] played bass on some of the other tracks and then lead guitars, I did some [guitar] leads, but all lead vocals. And then Jessie, he did background vocals, too. So it was my baby from the beginning and that’s kind of why it’s got my name on it, too. Because it’s the first time in my career that I’ve written the whole album from top to bottom myself, so it’s worthy of the name this time. When it came to branding it with your name as opposed to a band name, did you have any sort of hesitation about doing that? No, not really. It kind of all made sense, just because of what I explained. I never have an issue coming up with band names like a lot of my friends do. I just don’t have problems. I’ve always…I think anyway, [come up with interesting band names like] Echobrain and Papa Wheelie and a million of the other ones on projects — the different cool stuff we’ve come up with for years and years. So it was appropriate that the name’s on there. And also, now that this time has passed and I have spent 30 years working on this — half of it in Metallica and half of it with other bands — it’s a global thing. You know, Metallica is bigger across the ocean than it is in the United States. It always has been from the beginning. In that whole thing, we traveled around 50 countries we played in to take the music around. So I have to approach it as that and no matter what language you speak, if you are at all familiar with metal circles from the last few decades, “Newsted,” you know what that means and “metal,” you know what that means, no matter what language you speak. And I want to make it real clear that because of all of the diverse acts that I’ve played with and the music that I’ve recorded – Echobrain, Gov’t Mule, Sepultura, Unkle – you know, pick a few of those. I want to make sure that everybody is very clear on what they’re getting when they go after this one. Hearing ‘Soldierhead’ as the opening shot from this EP, it communicates and suggests that you’ve got a pretty good idea of what kind of music people want to hear from Jason Newsted at this point. How much did that play into what you’ve been writing? Is that something you think about? No, that’s kind of strange, actually. I’m old school metal. I can’t be anything but that. You know, I stretch out and round myself out playing with these other styles, Gov’t Mule and whatever [else] like that to make myself a better player, but I’m still old school thrash metal, man. And that’s what comes out, when I bare down on it and I play what I play best, this is what you get. This is what I spent the most years/months/weeks/eons playing [Laughs]. So that’s my forte, you know? So it’s what I know best and that’s why it’s what you’re hearing. I’m really not…..the fans did call me back into this and I am doing this because of the fans [and] because I want to. There is nothing about worrying about making money or selling a million records or any of that, [that] is not in the mix. The mix is about anybody sharing it with me that wants to. I have enough friends and fans around the world [and I] hope they’ll dig it for what it is and that’s all I really want. I want to be able to share it with anybody who wants to hear it. You know, when I went and played with Metallica at the end of 2011 at the Fillmore – when I got that response from the fans that I did that week….dude, for real, I’ve been telling everybody this, but it’s the absolute truth – they pulled me back in. They asked for it – they screamed for it [and] they looked right through me, right to the back of my skull and said “dude, we are so happy to see you – can you please do more?” and that’s really what it came down to. And now, as I reach myself out in the last couple of months on my social media and stuff, I am realizing how important that Metallica has been in so many people’s lives. And that I was always the people person in that band. I spent so much time with fans in my career that it’s really coming back to me in a very strong positive manner. How did you channel that when you approached making this music? Because I think some people might expect that you would take an experience like that and make an EP that sounds a lot like what you did with Metallica. There’s elements of that in this, but it’s certainly not all about that. I think really, as we started out talking, the influences show themselves very clearly and then [also] the people that I have been privileged enough to spend time with for myself, to learn from greater players. [James] Hetfield the most years, obviously, and he is the very best at what he does. No one can touch that same growl, playing those kind of guitar parts, singing the way he sings. He is it. So I got to be around that for a long time, in dressing rooms, it’s Lars [Ulrich] and Kirk [Hammett] in that one and Jason and James in that one. That’s how it was for the whole time. So as far as taking that on, you take on each other’s things. When you saw our Metallica onstage, after a while when we got in sync, it looked like we belonged together, really, a lot. It really fired off in that way and James and I took on each others movements, actions, styles and things like that. Anything that I got exposed to for a few years – even the guys from Echobrain, the way that they went about it in their musicality of things and their understanding of the way music goes together and songwriting and stuff – I learned a lot from that. And most of all, I think the four or five years that I spent with Voivod, were the biggest learning things for me, because the challenge was greater. You know, they speak in French and A-B-C-D-E on the guitar to them is do re mi fa so la ti and so that already to begin with was a challenge and then you go to Piggy’s [late Voivod guitarist Denis D’Amour] guitar playing and he doesn’t tune his guitar like anybody else tunes it – he tunes it his way. But it’s not a tuning that you can say “hey, he’s playing an A chord, because he’s not.” So all of that learning experience and especially with Snake [Voivod vocalist Denis Belanger], the vocal approach, weaving the words in – English is his second language, so he has no in between connector words. He just goes the direction that every word means something. So that kind of approach and just the way that he does weave it – I think he’s the very best at that, as far as me being a fan. I learned so much from him. Taking in all of these experiences, this is what we get now, from me paying attention. Vocally, how easy was it finding your vocal space when you came down to recording this material. Because I do hear the influence of your time with Voivod, but I also hear other things, so I’m just curious where you really were drawing from? I’ve been working on my real voice for like 10 years. Always, when we do the improv jams at Chophouse [Newsted’s recording studio] or any of the other things, I have my books of poetry and songs and stuff and they’re just put up on a music stand and we rock through improv stuff and I sing and sing it and sing it. [There’s] been years and years of that, developing a real voice instead of just “Diiiiiiie” [imitates guttural metal vocal] and all of that stuff, right? I can still do all of that of course – that’s what I’m kind of known for. The Papa Wheelie voice and things like that and in the beginning the IR8 voice and all of that Sepultura stuff. As time has gone by now, and especially with Echobrain, I tried to start learning to sing a little bit more. It’s actually a new voice [with this material] – I have a new voice, even though I’ve got some years under my belt, this is a new thing. I work it out like I do my regular workout of situps and pushups and all of that – I work my voice out as well with training, so I can be as good of a singer as I can when I present this to people, because I feel that the performances on the recordings are quite good and I really worked with them a long time and I practiced them a lot to get to that place. So it’s something that I’ve been really consciously working on for about a decade to try to come away from the Cookie Monster [vocals] all of the time. Some of the transitions and pacing of this material are really interesting. The moment when ‘King of the Underdogs’ kicks in right around the one minute mark is just brutal. Can you talk a bit about the building process for that song? Oh thank you – I love that part too! [Laughs] That song’s a little bit older and it just showed up that way. You know, once I built the songs, I’d burn a disc and I’d give it to Jessie and Jesse [Jesus “Jesse” Mendez, former Metallica drum tech and current Newsted drummer] and they’d go study for a week or two and come back and we’d hit it and then we’d create what the songs are. So that just came from, building from the demo and then just going over and over and over it until we got what we liked and then we were able to really capture it in the studio. It’s just a natural thing — it just showed up. A lot of this stuff dude, it’s the same as the paintings – I just make myself available – I reach up and I touch into that zone and it just comes and I just channel it and I make sure that the recorder is on. I think – and I didn’t realize it until now, because I went so full on, with the recording of all of the parts and understanding the compositions of stuff like that – that the way I had to go about it was a long road, but when I finally got there, I was ready. All of the things that I had done, I was ready for it, so when I started channeling the music, it was recorded right away as it hit me, because I had a guitar in my hands. It makes for the immediacy of the song – like that part that you’re particularly speaking of — there’s such an anticipation….that tension and that thing that comes, that was a channeled thing — it just happens because I made it available and my capacity from studying all of the years, I could do it when it came to me. But it really is like that. ‘Soldierhead,’ I think it probably came to me in like 10 minutes and I got the main riff down and then the lyrics just came to me and I said “this is going to be the one” and I had it done by that night and it just showed up, because I keep chasing it, man. Stay tuned for Part 2 of our Jason Newsted interview, in which he delves deeper into his new music and beating Justin Bieber on an iTunes chart, and Part 3, in which he talks about his relationship with Metallica and reminisces on his days in the legendary metal band. [button href=”http://loudwire.com/newsted-soldierhead-video/” title=”Click to Watch Newsted’s ‘Soldierhead’ Video” align=”center”] ?

Motley Crue’s Nikki Sixx Opens Up About Grandfather’s Cancer Battle

Michael Buckner, Getty Images In today’s social media world, we have more access than ever to our favorite rockers, and that means often seeing more than just the idol onstage but the actual person as well. One such case is happening at present with Motley Crue ‘s Nikki Sixx , who is sharing with fans his personal anguish as he deals with his grandfather’s battle with cancer. Sixx has been very open in sharing his own issues with fans over the years. He chronicled his early career drug dependency in the book ‘The Heroin Diaries: A Year in the Life of a Shattered Rock Star.’ He then opened up musically about the experience, forming the band Sixx: A.M. to share his thoughts musically. Plus, he’s become a radio personality with his ‘Sixx Sense’ show over the years, which gives him another outlet to speak his mind. In a deeply personal and cathartic letter written to his fans via his Facebook page , Sixx is attempting not only to share what he’s going through, but to open discussion with others dealing with similar issues. The letter reads as follows: I’ve been sharing my insides with you for so long I guess there is no reason to stop now. On some level this is how I connect and hopefully relate some event, place or time to each others lives … I agree it’s odd to do it on Facebook or Twitter (or any other social media portal) but I guess like you, I am trying to work out the wrinkles, iron out the kinks and maybe feel some relief from the pain that comes with life sometimes. It’s been really hard holding it together the last few months with my grandfather Tom being so sick. Watching him change daily breaks my heart as he is slowly breaking down. The doctors gave him 3 to 6 months to live 4 months ago … This prostate cancer is a ticking time bomb and our hearts are breaking in slow motion … The reality of it all is kicking in for my whole family … Why do I tell you this? Cause maybe I am not the only one in pain. We all deal with it in different ways. I can’t run to a bottle or a bindle of powder so I talk about it and as it happens, usually write music about it … This man was there for me like a father. He never let me down … he was a role model and my biggest fan … The water run’s deep between us so the blade of the knife also hits the bone … Love is a two edged swords … So we learn with death at our footsteps… Thank you for listening … I actually would love to hear your story too. We at Loudwire send our positive thoughts to Nikki Sixx as he goes through this difficult period. [button href=”http://loudwire.com/motley-crue-nikki-sixx-sex-twitter-dave-mustaine-sixx-a-m/” title=”Next: Nikki Sixx Talks Twitter + Sixx: A.M.’s Future” align=”center”]

Nine Inch Nails’ Trent Reznor Offers Insight Into How to Destroy Angels

Facebook: How To Destroy Angels Trent Reznor is a man who wears many hats. Along with fronting the legendary Nine Inch Nails , Reznor has lent his talents to composing film scores, original music for video games, and has produced albums for Marilyn Manson and Jane’s Addiction . Reznor latest project is an upcoming EP from his group How to Destroy Angels. For those of you who are unfamiliar with How to Destroy Angels, the group consists of Reznor, fellow Academy Award winner Atticus Ross (who composed the film soundtrack for ‘The Social Network’ and ‘The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo’ with Reznor), Nine Inch Nails art director Rob Sheridan and vocalist Mariqueen Maandig, who also happens to be Trent Reznor’s beautiful wife. The band released a self-titled EP in 2010, with their second one, ‘An Omen EP’ to see a release in November. “We’ve been working on this kind of in the shadows throughout ‘The Social Network’ and ‘The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo’ soundtracks since the core people are all kind of in the same area,” says Reznor in an interview with BBC1 Radio. “We’ve just been chipping away at this thing, and it’s been a nice pressure release valve really to have something to dump this energy into that doesn’t fit the other containers. It’s been fun. He continues, “We’ve just been playing around with the idea of the way that people consume music and listen to it and how big the chunks are. I think coming off of releasing ‘The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo’ soundtrack that clocked in at 2 hours, we thought let’s do something that’s more manageable, digestible little bits here.” Reznor also speaks about an upcoming 2013 full-length for How to Destroy Angels. “Part of what’s on the EP is taken from a full-length record that’s 98% finished. That’s scheduled for a release at the beginning of next year.” Yesterday, How To Destroy Angels released ‘Keep It Together’ as the first single from ‘The Omen EP.’ Click below to listen: [button href=”http://loudwire.com/trent-reznor-how-to-destroy-angels-new-single-keep-it-together/” title=”Listen to How To Destroy Angels, ‘Keep it Together'” align=”center”]

Danko Jones, ‘Just a Beautiful Day’ – Exclusive Video Premiere

Danko Jones – YouTube Channel Danko Jones are back with a blistering new track called ‘Just a Beautiful Day’ and Loudwire is proud to present the exclusive video premiere of the performance-based clip, which shows the raw energy of what the band put into the song. The track has a very percussive feel, with the band’s new drummer — Atom Willard, formerly of Rocket From the Crypt, the Offspring, Angels & Airwaves and Social Distortion — pounding away on the skins at a frenetic pace. In addition, both Danko Jones and his longtime bass counterpart John ‘JC’ Calabrese provide the driving track with some crunchy riffage. Calabrese told Loudwire, “I’m glad that that’s been the song to represent this record in a way because it has a lot of elements to it that are rocking and have a lot of melody.” Having spent so much time on their last record cranking out videos with special guests like Elijah Wood, Lemmy Kilmister , Selma Blair, and Ralph Macchio, singer Danko Jones said it was time for the band to go back to the basics for the ‘Just a Beautiful Day’ shoot. “We did so much with the last record in terms of stars and storyline and it was a big to-do that I think the only natural thing to do was to take it back,” explained Jones. “If we tried to follow up on what we did for the last record with all the celebrities and stuff we’d just become like that band that has all the famous people in their videos – more famous than them. So it was good to just take it a step back. It’s cool. I definitely like it.” The black-and-white performance piece was shot by The Diamond Brothers, who’ve previously worked with the band on past videos as well as the recent documentary, ‘Bring on the Mountain.’ The clip, shot in a New York loft, finds the band pouring every ounce of adrenaline into the track possible while the camera shot blur in and out of focus mirroring the ferocity of the track. ‘Just a Beautiful Day’ is the lead single from the band’s new album, ‘ Rock and Roll Is Black and Blue ,’ due Oct. 9. Pre-order the disc here . Watch Danko Jones’ ‘Just a Beautiful Day’ Video [button href=”http://loudwire.com/australia-2013-soundwave-festival-metallica-linkin-park-a-perfect-circle-stone-sour-anthrax-more/” title=”Next: Danko Jones Playing Australia’s Soundwave 2013 Fest” align=”center”]

Papa Roach Preview New Song ‘Before I Die’ in Behind-the-Scenes Video

Mary Ouellette, SheWillShootYou.com With less than two weeks to go before the Oct. 2 release of Papa Roach ‘s latest album ‘ The Connection ,’ the band has released a behind-the-scenes video (watch below) that talks about the new album, and includes portions of the new song ‘Before I Die.’ It’s a revealing video that begins with vocalist Jacoby Shaddix in the hospital, holding up a post-it note that says ‘scared,’ as he prepares for surgery on his vocal cord. Papa Roach had to drop off the Rockstar Energy Drink Uproar Festival after a week due to nodules on Shaddix’s vocal cord. Band members also talk about the meaning of the album title ‘The Connection’ in the video.  Shaddix told Loudwire  recently how they decided on that title. “What ‘The Connection’ means to us, it’s our connection to the music, it’s the connection of this music to the fans, it’s the connection that we make onstage with our music, it’s the connection from fan-to-fan on the social Internet marketing media world. It’s like when the Facebook fans start to get to know each other, they come to shows and meet each other and make friends.” He added, “It’s just this connection that Papa Roach makes is bigger than us sitting in a room jamming. It’s larger than life now and we’re just the facilitators for that, so it’s just painfully obvious that this is what it needs to be.” In the video, Shaddix also reveals that he split with his wife during the making of the record. “There was a point where she wanted to go experience life without me. That was the moment I feared in my life the most.  Something so dear to me was being taken away against my will.” His recovery from the procedure is going well, according to a message Shaddix recently posted on Facebook . “Things are lookin good!!! The doctor says my vocal cords look like they are healing very well. So happy so blessed so grateful.” It looks like he’ll be ready to go in time for Papa Roach’s European tour in November. Watch Papa Roach – ‘The Connection’ Part 1 [via  ArtistDirect ]