Posts Tagged ‘metallica’

Who Played ‘Thrash’-Style Riffing First Metallica or Metal Church?

  Australia’s Sticks For Stones recently conducted an interview with METAL CHURCH guitarist Kurdt Vanderhoof. On which band was formed first — METALLICA or METAL CHURCH: Kurdt: “[It’s] hard to say. METALLICA didn’t exist when I was trying to put METAL CHURCH together. And Lars [Ulrich, METALLICA drummer] stopped in San Francisco to visit friends, and that’s where I met him, I’ve known Lars longer than he’s known James [Hetfield, METALLICA frontman]. So… I don’t know. It’s […]

Trivium – Silence In The Snow

Every Trivium release after Ascendancy has initially been met with some backlash by fans of the band. Pretty much every band by the album is solid, but every album is a departure from the previous one, so getting fixated on certain aspects of the sound of the band always leads to disappointment. That’s not to say that all criticism of their work is invalid, but there is always a yearning for older elements of the band’s sound from some. Yet, despite this, Trivium keep pushing forward, and with every album they change the shell around the core of their sound. Sometimes it works better than others, as the intricate and progressive Shogun was an absolute masterpiece, In Waves was their most diverse album, and while Vengeance Falls was met with some degree of negativity, its second half had some of the best songs they’ve ever written. Silence in the Snow  is the Florida quartet’s seventh album, and it sees them taking a different direction yet again, with a heavy bent towards traditional metal and the complete eschewing of screaming (which works out surprisingly well), and bringing back the elements of the fabled Shogun sound. And while the end result works more often than not, it’s a bit flawed. It’s hard to weigh the strengths and weaknesses of Silence in the Snow against each other, as they’re mostly disparate. The songs have structure issues, but the actual riffs that are in there are pretty great. Perhaps the easiest way to sort this out is to just lay the issues out there and let everyone sort them out for themselves. There is really one prime problem with this album, and everything else stems out from it. That problem is the reliance on choruses, or more specifically, song structures that emphasize choruses. Pretty much every song has a verse-chorus-verse-chorus-solo-chorus structure. Some of the best aspects of Trivium songs are “the riffs in between”, things that lead verses into choruses, interludes, pre-solo sections, et cetera. The band not having any screaming on this album is really no issue, as there aren’t any riffs that make one go “I wish there was some screaming here”, but that’s actually the root of the issue here. It’s not that the band are no longer doing harsh vocals, it’s that they’re not writing riffs that they normally play when they’re doing harsh vocals. And while the screaming isn’t really missed, the riffing is. Further exacerbating this issue is the fact that the choruses area repeated a lot, which makes the songs feel rather simplistic and repetitive. It’s also a problem when a lot of the songs have their verses start with the “guitar plays a note or two then stops, and Matt sings over a bassline” bit, which gets old even faster. While those issues sound a bit grave, when the album works, it really works. It has some of the best lines they’ve ever written. The riffing isn’t really the focus on most of the songs, the vocals are, and the riffing just provides a backdrop for the singing. While Matt Heafy isn’t the best singer out there, he’s better than he ever was (and he doesn’t rely heavily on pitch correction either, as live videos make very evident) and he pulls off a singing-driven album well. And while the complaints about choruses being too prevalent stands, they’re damn good choruses. It’s so easy to sing-along to everything in the album, and it’s all ridiculously catchy and memorable. The heavy metal influence is prevalent mostly on a few songs, whereas the rest are Shogun-era Trivium songs with the screaming bits cut out and the choruses emphasized. That album has been the holy grail for the band’s fanbase since its release, and this album brings back pretty much every aspect of that sound minus the heavier parts. The lack of more intense riffing probably partly due to the fact that the singing is a lot more difficult than what the band has done before, and Matt has to focus on his voice, which forces him to just play basic rhythms. The band mostly cover that up with great song writing, proving their claim they’ve been making for years that it’s not about how hard the riff you play is, but how good the riff sounds. And for guitar enthusiasts, the band still have neat riffs in some of the songs, and their solos, which every song has, are some of their best. Really, how much one enjoys this album will come down to what they’ve come to expect from Trivium over the years. If their image of the band was that of a metalcore band with screaming and melodeath-esque riffing, they will probably be disappointed. But if they liked Trivium for their melodies, Matt’s singing and the memorable lines, this album contains more of those than ever. They’ve brought back some of their best songwriting elements, and while the implementation is a bit flawed due to the simplistic structure of the songs, the end result is really good and is full of stupidly catchy riffs and choruses. In ways, Silence in the Snow is the “Black Album” of Trivium’s career, as it reflects a position in their musical progression similar to how that album was situated for Metallica . And while this might (rightfully) alienate some longtime fans, it’s just a different direction and not really a bad one. The aspects that are lacking are undeniable, but what’s here is also compelling in its own right. ? Trivium –  Silence In The Snow gets… 3.5/5 -NT

Shredhammer-Beyond Your Reach

Self-Release/Independent 2014 Much tanks to Against PR for sending unsigned German thrashers Shredhammer my way. Formed in January of 2013, first under the name of Demolition Pulverizer before switching to their current (awesome) moniker with the arrival of lead vocalist Arnold Friedrich (Thrashtanica) in April of the same year, this Cologne-based five-piece draws their sound from the past all while giving it a nifty little modern twist. With fantastic nineties-style thrash leads from Jim Shred and Bob Hammer (Paragon Belial), heavy bass riffs from The Hellman (Ars Goetia, Drang, ex-Betrayer, ex-Deep Rise, ex-Vrieskou) and the insane drumming of Marlon Drescher (Malus, ex-Odium Immortalis, ex-Poisoned Gift, ex-Somnium Mortuum, ex-Mørkriket) the band cranks out old-school metal (Sacred Reich, Possessed, Exodus, Kreator, old Sepultura, mid-period C.O.C., Metallica and Slayer) with just enough groove (Pantera) to get your juices flowing! If there’s any downside to be found from this 4-track demo it’s the short-length. But seeing as this just the first stab from this German bunch that’s a minor gripe. Shredhammer are well worth your attention especially if old-school thrash/groove is the kind of thing that rings your bell!? https://www.facebook.com/Shredhammer

Randy Blythe Taking Break From Lamb of God

Looks like Lamb of God will have a longer than usual break between albums this time around, maybe even a permanent break. Randy Blythe has announced he is taking time off and won’t even think about Lamb of God for a long time. So what does this mean. For me personally, this sucks. I have […]

Grammy’s Have Become Hard To Watch

Last night was the 2014 Grammy Awards and it was very hard to watch. The show has become so ridiculous and of course the award show snubs Heavy Metal and Hard Rock. The Grammy Award show even managed to ruin the closing artists performance, as usual. Dave Grohl, Trent Reznor, and Queens of the Stone […]

Metallica Interviewed By CBS

(CBS News) “Enter Sandman” was one of the high-voltage hits that’s put the rock band Metallica on the charts again and again. They talk about the good times — and bad — with Anthony Mason . . . For The Record: As if the world’s biggest heavy metal band wasn’t big enough, in their film, “Metallica […]

Tool Receive Praise From Members of Metallica, Rage Against the Machine, Gojira + More

Tool Dissectional Tool are one of the most critically praised and fan-worshipped bands in the world. The experimental quartet are musically complex, influential and incredibly original with both their music and videos. To celebrate the band (and probably to encourage them to finish their fifth studio album), some of today’s finest musicians, such as Tom Morello and Rob Trujillo , have praised the Los Angeles manipulators of sound. In an Artist Direct original column, Rage Against the Machine guitarist Tom Morello recalls witnessing Tool’s very first show “There was a band called Green Jello, who later changed its name to Green Jelly, and Danny Carey was the drummer,” tells Morello. “Maynard sometimes worked with them and lived in this loft where a lot of musicians lived in Los Angeles. Tool actually had their first show in that loft! A couple of the other guys from Rage Against the Machine were at the gig too, when we had just started writing songs. Maynard had been my roommate for a while, and I had grown up with Adam. I’ll be frank. We did not have the highest expectations for what was going to occur at that loft gig and we went kind of as “friend rock” [Laughs]. They were devastatingly awesome from the very first show though. There’s no other way to say it. They were just awesome. It was unbelievable.” Metallica bassist Rob Trujillo is a huge Tool fan, and so does his son. “My little boy loves Tool!,” states Trujillo. “When I take him to school, we’re playing Tool all the time, so I definitely connect with them. There’s a lot of bass in that group, which is nice. They’re a great band for a bass player to listen to. So believe it or not, my son and I are going through a big Tool phase! It includes every record too.” Gojira frontman Joe Duplantier credits Tool for creating his favorite album and getting him addicted to it in his sleep! “’10,000 Days’ is my favorite record, raves the frontman. “The first time I heard it, I didn’t get it. I forced myself to listen to it two times in a row. Then, I fell asleep with the album repeating, and I spent the whole night with the album in my ears. Maybe that’s why I got addicted! I heard it six or seven times in one night. It got to my brain very deeply. Now, I’m addicted [Laughs].” Check out Artist Direct for more testimonials from members of Iron Maiden , Machine Head , Korn + more. [button href=”http://loudwire.com/tool-drummer-danny-carey-new-album-drop-in-2013-talks-vespa-crash/” title=”Tool Drummer Says New Album Will Still See 2013 Release” align=”center”]

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